Tag Archives: radiohead

Mercury Prize 2008.

So, the cat is well and truly out of the bag: the Mercury Prize Shortlist has been announced, and the twelve albums of which it is comprised are:

Adele – ’19’
British Sea Power – ‘Do You Like Rock Music?’
Burial – ‘Untrue’
Elbow – ‘The Seldom Seen Kid’
Estelle – ‘Shine’
The Last Shadow Puppets – ‘The Age Of The Understatement’
Laura Marling – ‘Alas I Cannot Swim’
Neon Neon – ‘Stainless Style’
Portico Quartet – ‘Knee-Deep In The North Sea’
Robert Plant And Alison Krauss – ‘Raising Sand’
Radiohead – ‘In Rainbows’
Rachel Unthank And The Winterset – ‘The Bairns’

My immediate reactions were twofold: firstly, what happened to Portishead and MIA, whose stellar albums have been improbably overlooked; and then, perhaps predictably, who on earth is Rachel Unthank, not to mention her beloved Winterset? Continue reading

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Lyrics.

If a singer has nothing about which to sing, is there any point in him singing actual lyrics? Continue reading

Sigur Rós – Westminster Methodist Central Hall Review.

Concerts coinciding with album releases are often filled with a special kind of buzzing atmosphere: for the band, there is a desire to please an obviously devoted crowd with some highlights from a stunning back-catalogue whilst also giving an airing to some new songs; for the audience, it’s always a thrill to see a band who have just spent most a year cooped up in a variety of studios, suddenly unleashing their magic once again, on the road. For Sigur Rós yesterday night, this special atmosphere was intensified by a beautifully intimate venue – Westminster Methodist Central Hall – where even those seated at the back of the balcony could be treated to a close encounter with one of the most emotionally raw and unadulterated bands touring today. With Radiohead performing on the other side of London in the detached environment of Victoria Park, it was clear that here in Westminster, we could be in for an evening’s entertainment that was alternately charming, exhilarating, deafening and heart-wrenching. Continue reading

Sigur Rós – Westminster Methodist Central Hall.

I’m very excited about this concert.

I’m hoping it sounds a bit like this:

I hope it sounds a bit like this.

The only tinge of regret I’m feeling is for not having a ticket to see Radiohead the next day 😦

Mercury Prize.

Last year, the shortlist for the Mercury Prize was announced on the 17th of July, suggesting that in just under a month’s time, this year’s shortlist is sure to make an appearance. My interest in the Prize waxes and wanes, depending on the shortlist: all too often the judges fall back on lowest-common-denominator material such as, on last year’s shortlist, the thoroughly boring Hats off to the Buskers by The View, along with every Coldplay album ever. My experiences of the winning albums have also been something of a mixed bag: in 2006, Arctic Monkeys won with their debut, ahead of (in my opinion) more worthy albums from Muse and Guillemots; conversely, last year, Klaxons won the prize ahead of Arctic Monkeys, who had since returned with the infinitely superior Favourite Worst Nightmare.

Nevertheless, there’s no doubting the Prize’s ability to – overnight, frequently – thrust a struggling yet talented artist into the limelight, thus ensuring a short-term boost in sales. Elsewhere in its history, the nominees and winners have definitely caused me to further investigate a particular artist, as in the case of Antony and the Johnsons in 2005 (who won), and Richard Hawley in 2006 (who didn’t).

Though I have no fear in saying that British music is at an all time nadir, it is with some optimism that I would suggest the past twelve months have seen signs of a resurgence among our more experimental and esoteric, risk-taking artists, and I really hope the judges take a careful look at such albums when making their decisions this year. Though I doubt my selections will bear any relation to the real shortlist, here are some British albums that have been released since last August (the usual cut-off point) that I feel the judges would be loath to ignore: Continue reading

25 Albums of 2007.

I do realise that we are half-way through 2008, but, still, I thought it worth mentioning, if only to elucidate anyone of my personal preferences. And, with the nominations for the 2008 Mercury Prize surely but a month or two away, it’s worth recounting some of the albums from the latter half of last year that may be eligible for this year’s award.

In alphabetical order:
Animal Collective – Strawberry Jam
Arcade Fire – Neon Bible
Arctic Monkeys – Favourite Worst Nightmare
Battles – Mirrored
Bloc Party – A Weekend In The City
Bright Eyes – Cassadaga
Burial – Untrue
Deerhunter – Cryptograms
Dizzee Rascal – Maths + English
Field Music – Tones of Town
The Good, The Bad & The Queen – The Good, The Bad & The Queen
Interpol – Our Love To Admire
KanYe West – Graduation
Kings of Leon – Because of the Times
LCD Soundsystem – 45:33
LCD Soundsystem – Sound of Silver
Low – Drums And Guns
M.I.A. – Kala
Modest Mouse – We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank
The National – Boxer
Of Montreal – Hissing Fauna, Are You The Destroyer?
Prinzhorn Dance School – Prinzhorn Dance School
Queens of the Stone Age – Era Vulgaris
Radiohead – In Rainbows
The Shins – Wincing The Night Away Continue reading

Invocation.

I have an unhealthy obsession with music. It courses through my blood like a particularly unhealthy intoxicant, often standing in the way of me getting things done. Hopefully some of this love can spill over into this blog which, now that I have a decent amount of free time, I hope to keep current with new, old or unusual music.

There are many music blogs, and I don’t have a problem with that, because, as I see it, they are our best hope in spreading knowledge of great music that’s being made today. Here in the UK, the public’s tastes in music are homogenised and nullified by generic radio stations that are predominantly free of individualism, and so entirely unoriginal music has been allowed to reign. There’s a lot to be admired in American culture, where the power of the blogosphere has ignited the rise of original, free-spirited artists without stifling them into record contracts the second they gain exposure. Hopefully, through music blogs, the same changes can gain a foothold elsewhere in the world. Continue reading